Undergraduate Courses

FCID


FCID 3500 - The Holocaust from the Victims' Perspectives

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the documentary and fictional forms chosen by the victims of the Holocaust (1933-45), studying diaries and memoirs, as well as fictional texts and films.We will also engage with the theories and controversies surrounding these narratives. As we read and study how victims responded to the Third Reich, the War, and the Holocaust, we will begin by reading short excerpts from testimonies while we read a history of the Holocaust. Then we will read a comprehensive memoir to follow the history. We will focus on memoirs written shortly after the end of the War, followed by memoirs and fictionalizations written later. Since Holocaust denial is now a part of our culture, unfortunately, we will read Deborah Lipstadt’s memoir of her trial against the denier David Irving. The course spans various disciplines but will concentrate on how individual victims expressed and reflected upon their experiences.

Semester Offered: Spring


FCID 4000 - Capstone in Transnational European Studies: Displaced Persons

Broadly designed around the notion of “Displaced Persons,” the course will focus on the representation of the European transnational experience and questions of cultural difference in 20th-century German literature and film. We will read and discuss poems, plays, novels, and essays by authors such as Joseph Berger, Bertolt Brecht, George Tabori, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, Herta Müller, and Ghita Schwarz and watch and examine films by directors John Walter, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Fatih Akin and Margarethe von Trotta. A requirement for this class is the completion of a capstone project for the Transnational European Studies minor, the nature of which will be discussed during the first week of class. Taught in English.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: FCID 2000 or Permission of Department - Contact german@uga.edu

GRMN


GRMN 1001 - Elementary German I

The goal of German 1001 is to develop the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) in a cultural context with a focus on spoken German. The course will enable you to communicate in German about everyday topics, including friends and family, housing, daily routine, leisure activities, food and shopping. You will learn to interpret authentic German language texts from a variety of media and enhance your knowledge of cultural issues. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring


GRMN 1002 - Elementary German II

German 1002 continues to develop the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) in an authentic cultural context. The course will enable you to communicate in German about everyday topics such as education, leisure activities and travel and present information about German-speaking countries, the EU and German history. You will learn to interpret authentic German language texts from a variety of media and enhance your knowledge of cultural issues. The prerequisite for German 1002 is German 1001 at UGA, the equivalent course at another university or placement by exam.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 1001 or placement by exam


GRMN 1110 - Accelerated Elementary German

German 1110 develops the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) in an authentic cultural context. The course will enable you to communicate in German about everyday topics, including your family, yourself, your everyday routine, shopping, education and recreational activities. You will learn to interpret authentic German language texts from a variety of media and enhance your knowledge of cultural issues. German 1110 requires some previous German. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall


GRMN 2001 - Intermediate German I

German 2001 continues to develop the four language skills in a cultural context. It also reviews and expands upon the basic grammar covered in first-year German classes. By the end of this course you should have: increased your ability to communicate about topics of general interest orally and in writing; gained greater competence in German grammar; broadened your active and passive vocabulary; learned to read texts of various genres; and enhanced your knowledge of cultural issues.The prerequisite for this course is German 1002 or German 1110 at UGA, the equivalent at another university, or placement by exam. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 1002, GRMN 1110, or placement by exam


GRMN 2002 - Intermediate German II

German 2002 continues to develop your language skills in a cultural context. It also reviews and expands upon the basic grammar covered in first-year German classes and in German 2001. By the end of this course you should have significantly enhanced your knowledge of cultural issues, increased your ability to communicate about topics of general interest orally and in writing, gained greater competence in German grammar, broadened your active and passive vocabulary, and learned to read texts of various genres. The prerequisite for this course is German 2001 at UGA, the equivalent at another university, or placement by exam.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 2001 or placement by exam


GRMN 2140 - Intermediate German (Honors)

German 2140H continues to develop the four language skills in a cultural context. It also reviews and expands upon the basic grammar covered in first-year German classes. By the end of this course you should have: increased your ability to communicate about topics of general interest orally and in writing; gained greater competence in German grammar, broadened your active and passive vocabulary; learned to read texts of various genres; and enhanced your knowledge of cultural issues. This course involves an accelerated pace and more intensive level of study with the expectation that all students are self-motivated and prepared to invest a lot of time in independent study in preparation for class.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 1002 and permission of Honors


GRMN 2300 - Introduction to German Culture Studies

This course explores German literature as a window onto central themes and developments in German and Austrian society, culture and history in the 19th and 20th centuries. The focus is on realistic fiction as testimony to the lived experience of daily life, place, social class, gender, national identity, modernization, political crisis and conflict, persecution, and memory. Required of German majors; open to all students. Taught in English. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture or Humanities and Arts) and the Franklin College Fine Arts/Philosophy/Religion requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring


GRMN 3010 - Language: Culture and Society I

This introductory cultural studies course acquaints you with central social, cultural and political issues of post-war Germany. Our textbook is designed as a course for foreigners wishing to become German citizens. We are therefore becoming familiar with pertinent aspects of German culture from this unique and authentic vantage point. Our course also includes systematic grammar review. This class hones all your language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) while simultaneously teaching cultural content. It is a gateway course structured to prepare you for higher-level German classes.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 2002 or placement by exam


GRMN 3015 - Language: Engineering and Science

In this course, students will learn about central social, cultural, economic, political and scientific issues of the 20th and early 21st centuries pertinent to the development of modern Germany as a leader in engineering and technology.

While teaching cultural and scientific content, the course simultaneously aims to make you a more competent and proficient speaker and writer of German. You will also continue to hone your listening and reading skills as we watch videos and read articles on technological developments in Germany from online news websites such as Deutsche Welle, Bild der Wissenschaft, Natur and others. This course also includes grammar review and vocabulary development.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 2002 or GRMN 2110


GRMN 3020 - Language: Culture and Society II

The course consists of three major fields of inquiry:

1) Germans and Authority

For instance, how is police training and interaction with the public different from the States? What is the image of the German police? How and why are German detective shows different from American ones?

2) German Society and Culture in the Midst of Change

By watching the film Welcome, we explore the complexity involved in any process of integration. How is German culture changing right now as it deals with the huge task of absorbing more than a million refugees?

3) German Youth Culture

We will read Tschick, a bestselling German youth novel which presents the coming-of-age dilemmas with frankness, insight and humor.

The course includes grammar review and practice, as well as vocabulary building. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3110 - Germania

This course explores the history and culture of the Germanic world from the Bronze Age up until Charlemagne. Emphases include Roman-Germanic confrontation, the Nordic mythology of the Vikings and their relationship to early Germanic pagans, the Christianization of the Germanic tribes as well as the Germanic and German heroic epic. Taught in German. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture or Humanities and the Arts).

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3120 - German Courtly Literature

In this course, students will read a number of important and representative texts of the high Middle Ages in Germany and do three things with them: 1) understand them as products of a specific historical culture; 2) interpret them critically as complex & sophisticated works of art; and 3) work with them creatively and keep them alive & interesting in the 21st century. Taught in German.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture or Humanities and the Arts) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3410 - War, Sex, Nation-Building, and Empire in 19th Century Germany and Austria

We will look at key texts by German and Austrian writers from about 1800 to 1914, looking at how writers positioned themselves in terms of nationhood and empire. German-speaking writers reacted to the Napoleonic wars and their aftermath, the French 1830 revolution, the uprisings of 1848, and the various conflicts that brought about the establishment of the Second Reich. They also responded to the nationalist movements in Poland and Hungary. In addition, writers in the Eastern parts of the Prussian/German and Austro-Hungarian states, or writers who set their stories in these locales, confront issues of nation-building and empire. We will see how sexual relations (literally and figuratively) came to represent political, class, and religious issues. We will read plays and prose by Kleist, Büchner, Stifter, Fontane, Kafka, Mann and others, including the play Frühlings Erwachen [Spring Awakening] by Wedekind. The class will watch a film of one of the plays and excerpts from the American musical Spring Awakening.  Emphasis will be placed on student-led discussions and on speaking, reading, and writing in German. Taught in German.

Prerequisites: GRMN 3010 or GRMN 3070


GRMN 3420 - The German Romantic Age

This course will introduce students to the literature, art, music and the central social, cultural and political issues of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, a period in German literary and cultural history known as the Romantic Age. It is designed to provide an introduction to the important trends in society that informed the literature, art and political ideas of the period. Students will read a variety of representative texts, including fairy tales, poems, short stories, novellas and some theory. In addition, they will also study some of the artwork representative of this era. This course is reading-intensive, however, students will also have ample opportunity to continue to develop their spoken and written language skills in class discussion of the texts and in reflective essays. Taught in German.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3550 - Contemporary Issues in German Culture, Society, and Literature

Selected contemporary topics in the culture, civilization, language, or literature of German-speaking countries. Taught in English.


GRMN 3610 - Discussions of Post-War Literature: 1968

The year 1968 was a year of great political and cultural turmoil in Germany, Europe, and the United States. In today’s Germany, it is associated especially with the student revolt and the profound changes it initiated in German society. The events surrounding the German student movement that year included protests against the Vietnam War, new emergency laws passed by the German parliament, the assassination attempt on student leader Rudi Dutschke, attacks on the German tabloid press, and the first attacks by a terrorist group, which was come to be known as the Red Army Faction. In addition to their increased involvement in politics, the new generation of Germans challenged traditional conceptions of culture—from education and the role of women in German society, to the function of literature and the arts—leading German writers and artists to explore new forms of literary and artistic expression as well. In this seminar, we will revisit some of the events that galvanized the student movement, read literary and historical texts from and about the period, and discuss diverse forms of cultural expression representative of the time. Readings will be complemented by clips from both documentary and feature films.  

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3620 - The Wild Berlin of Bertolt Brecht

Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) was one of the twentieth-century’s most influential playwrights, known in particular for his theory of the epic theater. His writings have been translated into more than 40 languages and his plays continue to be performed all over the world. In addition to his success on the German stage, Brecht was a gifted and prolific poet, whose more than 6000 poems likewise constitute a significant body of work. In this seminar, we will focus on the writings from Brecht’s (early) Berlin period, roughly the years 1920 to 1933. At the time, Berlin was a bustling political, artistic, and cultural center— full of explosive political constellations and intense artistic controversy—and Brecht had a part in both its cultural construction and its literary (and cinematic) representation. Combining historical and systematic approaches, we will concentrate on discussing the aftermath of the First World War, the experience of urban life, Brecht’s depiction of the connection between crime and capitalism, and his keen interest in understanding a new social phenomenon: the masses. In his writings, Brecht addressed many pressing social, political, and artistic issues whose discussion is still relevant today. He was also known to constantly question the place of theater and literature in society, and revisiting some of his questions will allow us to inquire into the role of literature in contemporary society as well. The course will include the discussion of fine art and film as well as of texts from different literary genres, including poems, short stories, plays, theoretical essays, and opera libretti.  Taught in English.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Literature Requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: Permission of Honors


GRMN 3625 - Postwar Women Writers

In this course, we will read representative texts written by women authors after 1945, as well as view and discuss films by women filmmakers. We will aim to interpret and understand these works in light of their historical context-- the postwar period, the task of Vergangenheitsbewältigung, the feminist movement, developments in the East and West, as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and its consequences. Several questions will occupy us throughout the course: Do women write differently? Is there a female aesthetic? How do these texts reflect the lived reality of German women and men? All literary texts, films and class discussions will be in German.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3630 - Memory, History, Narrative

How do societies remember? What do societies, groups, and individuals choose to remember and forget, and why? How are memories and family stories passed down through the generations? Taking these broad questions as our guide, this seminar centers more specifically on public acts of remembrance in Germany, German cities as sites of remembrance, literature and film as media of memory, and European memory culture. Taught in German.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3710 - The Wall

This course explores the Berlin Wall as a site of history and imagination within the context of postwar politics, culture, and everyday life. We will discuss the events leading to the construction of the physical border, life with the Wall, the fall of the Wall and the persistence of mental “walls” between East and West Germans after unification. Specific areas of focus will be the ideological division of Germany; life in the GDR (youth culture, the planned economy, the Stasi); and Germany today. The course readings will be supplemented by historical documents, feature films, video and audio eye witness accounts, music and other media. By the end of the semester you should have a more detailed understanding of postwar events (chronology, cause and effect); ideology; historiography (how historical events were represented and interpreted in the FRG and GDR); aspects of everyday life in the GDR and unified Germany. Primary readings and discussion will be in German. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3830 - Children's and Youth Literature

The course consists of three parts: an examination of traditional stories, including fairy tales, followed by an analysis of contemporary picture books, and finally a close reading of Michael Ende’s Unendliche Geschichte as a neo‐romantic tale. The readings are in roughly chronological order, but we will make frequent cross‐ connections by looking at counter‐movements and tracing influences. We will pay close attention how the notions of childhood, identity and self‐realization are constructed and upheld within a specific cultural and historic context. We trace Postman’s argument that the impact of “full‐disclosure” media (TV) has effectively caused the concept of childhood to disappear. We will also take a closer look at the market mechanisms that govern the production, distribution, and reception of children’s literature which “does not exist” (Zipes). Taught in German.

Satisfies Core Area IV (Humanities and Arts) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010


GRMN 3840 - The Jewish Experience in German Literature and Culture

The class will focus on writings in German by self-identified Jewish authors from about 1800 to the present. How did Jewish-German writers express their identity as Jews in German culture? Some of the key questions, we will consider are: What contributions did Jewish writers make to German, Austrian, and world culture?; Was there ever really a Jewish-German symbiosis?; How did Jewish-German authors portray traditional Jewish culture, particularly in the East?; How did Jewish-German authors respond to the Holocaust?; and How do writers and filmmakers express themselves in today’s culture? Taught in English.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Fall


GRMN 3850 - Introduction to Goethe's Life and Works

Taking Goethe's late autobiographical writing Dichtung und Wahrheit as point of departure, this course explores the life and work of Goethe, focusing on dramatic, novelistic, and poetic genres for which he is renowned and considering their aesthetic, historical, and cultural implications. Taught in German; English as necessary. Not open to students who were in Spring 2015 Senior Seminar. 

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010 or GRMN 3070


GRMN 3870 - The German Fairy Tale Tradition

In German cultural and literary history, fairy tales are much more than nice, little stories for children that feature cute, talking animals and princesses who marry princes and live happily ever after; they are important texts about German cultural history and they may even give us a glimpse into the methods of crime reporting in the days before print media. Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are the most famous collectors of fairy tales, but they were by no means the first in German literary history. Earlier in the 19th century Clemens Brentano and Achim von Arnim compiled folktales and folksongs in their fairy tale collection The Boy’s Magic Horn (1805). The publications of these and later the Grimms’ tales served a larger, culturally unifying purpose in the first half of the 19th century, and many other German authors used the “fairy tale style” and fairy tale themes and motifs for their literary fairy tales. In this class, we will read a selection of Grimm fairy tales, literary fairy tales from the 19th century by authors such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Ludwig Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Clemens Brentano, Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué and Wilhelm Hauff and essays by some of the most well-known critics of the literary tradition of the fairy tale. We will also view cinematic versions of fairy tales and episodes of the television series Grimm to see how traditional fairy tales are being interpreted for modern society. Taught in German and English.  

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture or Humanities and the Arts) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010 (when taught in German)


GRMN 3990 - Directed Study in German

Independent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members. Repeatable for maximum six hours credit. 
 

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3010 or 3020


GRMN 4001 - Advanced German Composition and Conversation

This course revolves around three major areas of investigation pertaining to German culture and society:

1) Does freedom of choice really exist?

Based on the movie Das Leben der Anderen we will discuss how personal relationships are influenced and possibly determined by societal and political pressures. Under what conditions are autonomy and integrity even possible? 

2) What is Political Correctness really?

We will watch Die Neue, a recent German TV-show, to explore religious tensions when an orthodox Moslem student joins a typical German classroom. Which conflicts arise because of different religious and cultural beliefs? How are they playing out on the administrative, group and personal level?

3) What are some of the Dynamics of Interpersonal Conflicts?

Based on the movie Auf der anderen Seite by Fatih Akin we investigate the fabric of interpersonal interactions across two different cultures (German, Turkish), three families, and two generations. What do the interactions convey about culturally held beliefs regarding sexuality, obligations towards the family, and individual moral responsibility? 

This course will be refining your command of spoken and written German. The focus will be on developing a more sophisticated range of vocabulary and expressions, and obtaining more ease in dealing with the finer points of German grammar. A significant part of class time is spent on developing speaking skills. 

Semester Offered: Fall


GRMN 4015 - Magic, Monsters, and the Occult in German Literature

Germany has a long tradition in magic and the occult sciences, whether through its practitioners or its representation in literature. Some of the more well-known historical figures of German-speaking origin who were involved in one way or another in the occult sciences or occult societies include the legendary Faust figure, Paracelsus, Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim and many German poets and artists, such as Goethe, Schiller and Mozart to name a few. The purpose of this class is to take a new look at German literature – from an occult perspective. Considering the importance of some of the works, such as Faust, to world literature in general, it is important to understand the background in the occult sciences, on which works such as this one are based. When reading some popular works by authors such as Goethe and E.T.A. Hoffmann, for example, it is essential to have at least a basic understanding of occult sciences and the importance of occult ritual and initiation to fully comprehend and appreciate the works themselves. Germany was also instrumental in introducing monsters, such as the vampire and the Golem (considered to be the source for the Frankenstein monster) to literature and film. In addition to reading theory of magic, monsters and occult sciences, such as magic, alchemy and Cabala, students will have the opportunity to view films that address the themes and literature that will be covered in the course. Taught in English or German. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (Humanities and the Arts) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: GRMN 3020


GRMN 4020 - Theory and Practice of German Drama

This course familiarizes students with major developments in German-speaking theater. We will read several of the most enduring and well-loved plays in the German language, with special attention to their dramatic aspects as well as the specific cultural and historical contexts in which they were written. Class meetings will be spent in discussion of the plays we read, theatrical exercises, and the staging of short scenes. The second half of the semester will be spent working on the production of a play, in German, to be staged for the general public. The play will involve all students as actors and/or crew members and credit for the course is based in part on participation in the production process. Taught in German.  

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.


GRMN 4410 - The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

This course focuses on literary and cinematic representations of the Holocaust from postwar to contemporary Germany. The course aims to broaden students’ knowledge of the Holocaust and intends to provide them with a more profound understanding of the complex moral, historical, and aesthetic issues involved in the artistic representation of Nazi genocide. In addition to films on such topics as the Ghetto existence, the making of a concentration camp commander, and acts of resistance to Nazi persecution, the course includes the discussion of literary fiction and historical and theoretical texts. Beyond the analysis of individual texts and films we will address such overarching issues as the relationship between artistic and historical truth, the representation of the Holocaust in the two media, and the nature of Holocaust memory and memorialization. Taught in German. 

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: GRMN 3020


GRMN 4510 - Berlin: Perspectives on a Metropolis

The subject of this course is the impact of the crusades on the literature and culture of medieval Europe in general and Germany in particular. We will trace the development of religious theories and practices of warfare and a corresponding new, ethical-spiritual institution of the warrior (knighthood); explore the influence of these developments on literary genres like heroic epic, courtly romance, and courtly love poetry; and examine the long-term historical legacy of the German crusades in the Baltic and expansion in Eastern Europe. GRMN 4510 is a Special Topics course; course will differ from semester to semester.

Semester Offered: Spring


GRMN 4810 - Contemporary Issues in German Business and Politics

This discussion-based course emphasizes active participation in classroom discussion of current events topics and related activities. The expectation is that students enrolled in this course are interested in and aware of current events and that they will inform themselves about current events – beyond the assigned readings. Individual discussion topics for each session have been grouped within broader headings, such as Politik, Wirtschaft, deutsche Innen- und Außenpolitik, die USA in den deutschen Medien, Deutschland in der Welt, Kultur, Technik und Umwelt. For purposes of discussion we will use texts as well as audio and video recordings from Deutsche Welle and other news websites. We will start many of our class meetings by looking at the day’s headlines or listening to news broadcasts from Germany. Students will be encouraged to bring to class any news stories which they have found and would like to discuss. Taught in German. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: GRMN 3020

GRMN, LING


GRMN, LING 3280 - Contrastive Grammar: German-English

This course provides an overview of the differences between German and English grammar, with a focus on not only the individual study of the core linguistic modules of phonetics/phonology, morphology and syntax, but also the interaction between those modules, especially in bilinguals. Balancing the theoretical with the practical, we will analyze our own speech, and compare it to recent literature on the topic. Through such study, students will gain a better understanding of the differences between the two language-specific grammars, and will acquire tools to analyze and improve their own spoken German. Language of instruction will be English; however, has a language prerequisite and counts toward the degree as a course taught in German. 

Prerequisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN, LING 3860 - The Evolution of Modern Standard German

The goal of this course is the study of the sociohistorical processes and linguistic developments in German, concerning the establishment of the modern standard language. As such, we will study language shift and language change from both a diachronic and synchronic perspective. The standard language will therefore be presented as the result of cultural and linguistic developments, and of political and economic unification. Taught in German.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN, LING 3280 - Contrastive Grammar: German-English

This course provides an overview of the differences between German and English grammar, with a focus on not only the individual study of the core linguistic modules of phonetics/phonology, morphology and syntax, but also the interaction between those modules, especially in bilinguals. Balancing the theoretical with the practical, we will analyze our own speech, and compare it to recent literature on the topic. Through such study, students will gain a better understanding of the differences between the two language-specific grammars, and will acquire tools to analyze and improve their own spoken German. Language of instruction will be English; however, has a language prerequisite and counts toward the degree as a course taught in German. 

Prerequisites: GRMN 2002


GRMN, LING 3860 - The Evolution of Modern Standard German

The goal of this course is the study of the sociohistorical processes and linguistic developments in German, concerning the establishment of the modern standard language. As such, we will study language shift and language change from both a diachronic and synchronic perspective. The standard language will therefore be presented as the result of cultural and linguistic developments, and of political and economic unification. Taught in German.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: GRMN 2002

RUSS


RUSS 1001 - Elementary Russian I

In Russian 1001 you will learn the Russian alphabet, cursive handwriting, and pronunciation. The course will introduce you to basic grammatical structures in Russian and will cover vocabulary that will enable you to communicate on a number of everyday topics.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture). 

Semester Offered: Fall


RUSS 1002 - Elementary Russian II

RUSS 1002 is a continuation of RUSS 1001. By the end of this course you will have been exposed to all of the fundamental grammatical structures of Russian and you should have an active vocabulary of about 1000 words, which will allow you to communicate on a range of everyday topics.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: RUSS 1001


RUSS 2001 - Intermediate Russian I

This course reviews and builds upon the basic grammar and vocabulary acquired in RUSS 1001-1002. It is designed to help students improve their comprehension of written and spoken Russian; acquire greater competence in communicating their ideas in Russian; achieve greater facility and accuracy in the use of common grammatical structures; and expand their knowledge of Russian culture. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: RUSS 1002


RUSS 2001 - Intermediate Russian Conversation I

Designed to improve students’ proficiency in spoken Russian. This course will reinforce topics, grammatical structures, and vocabulary covered in Intermediate Russian I.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: RUSS 1002
Corequisites: RUSS 2001


RUSS 2002 - Intermediate Russian II

This course is a continuation of RUSS 2001. It is designed to help students improve their comprehension of written and spoken Russian; acquire greater competence in communicating their ideas in Russian; achieve greater facility and accuracy in the use of common grammatical structures; and expand their knowledge of Russian culture. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: RUSS 2001


RUSS 2002 - Intermediate Russian Conversation II

Designed to improve students' proficiency in spoken Russian. This course will reinforce topics, grammatical structures, and vocabulary covered in Intermediate Russian II.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: RUSS 2001
Corequisites: RUSS 2002


RUSS 2050 - Modern Russian Culture

Russian culture in the twentieth century. Examines both high culture (literature, art, architecture, classical music) and low or popular culture (film, popular music, various aspects of daily life) within the framework of the historical and political development of the period. No knowledge of Russian required.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture or Humanities and the Arts) and the Franklin College Fine Arts/Philosophy/Religion requirement.

Prerequisites: none


RUSS 2150 - Madness, Desire, and Death in 19th Century Russian Culture and Literature

Explores themes of madness, desire, and death in Russian literature and the arts, focusing on the 19th century. Study of masterpieces by Russian writers (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov), as well as non-fictional documents, such as Russian medical, judicial, and philosophical treatises and essays. All readings in English.


RUSS 3001 - Russian Conversation and Composition I

This course is designed to enhance and consolidate students' competence in the four language skill areas (speaking, reading, writing, and listening). The focus is on the comprehension of written texts and oral conversations, writing essays and learning more about contemporary Russian culture. On a regular basis students will make presentations and take part in class and online discussions. The course includes a guided review of challenging grammatical topics such as motion verbs, impersonal constructions, direct and indirect speech, verbal adjectives and adverbs.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: RUSS 2002


RUSS 3002 - Russian Conversation and Composition II

This course is the continuation of RUSS 3001. It is designed to enhance and consolidate students' competence in the four language skill areas (speaking, reading, writing, and listening). The focus is on the comprehension of written texts and oral conversations, writing essays and learning more about contemporary Russian culture. On a regular basis students will make presentations and take part in class and online discussions. The course will include a guided review of challenging grammatical topics such as motion verbs, impersonal constructions, direct and indirect speech, verbal adjectives and adverbs. 

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 3100 - Approaches to Russian/English Translation: Cultural, Sociolinguistic, and Grammatical Issues

In this course you will analyze different genres of Russian texts and some of the cultural, sociolinguistic, grammatical, and stylistic issues involved in translation. You will improve your ability to understand and interpret a wide variety of Russian texts. You will learn about different stylistic registers and devices used in different text genres and expand your knowledge of the Russian cultural and sociolinguistic context. You will also acquire a more thorough understanding of Russian grammar and syntax; we will focus on aspects of Russian grammar that pose particular difficulties for English-speaking learners, and will analyze the grammatical and syntactic structure of the texts that we read. The course will provide you with a non-technical introduction to aspects of translation theory, familiarize you with different types of translations, and give you practical experience in producing your own translations. It will also focus on translation as a means of acquiring a better understanding of some of the contrasts between Russian and English language and culture.

Semester Offered: Offered in alternate years
Prerequisites: RUSS 2002


RUSS 3300 - Introduction to Russian Cinema

A survey of the major periods, genres, and directors of the extensive Russian and Soviet cinematographic heritage, with particular attention to the immediate influence of historical, political, and cultural developments, questions of cultural identity, and the making of a national tradition. Regular in-class viewing and discussion of films. The class is conducted in English and all films will be shown with English subtitles.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Fine Arts/Philosophy/Religion requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring
Prerequisites: none


RUSS 3400 - The Stuff of the Soul: Dostoevsky's Prose and its Aesthetic and Ethical Influence

Fyodor Dostoevsky is a nationalistic, anti-Catholic, anti-Semitic, anti-Polish, anti-European (and certainly anti-American), fanatically religious, politically conservative 19th century Russian writer.  What is it about this man’s literature that forces itself mercilessly and inescapably on our imaginations no matter how up-to-date and politically correct we consider ourselves to be?  Why do Dostoevsky’s texts continue to haunt us like a bad trip no matter how far removed we may be from God -- the search for whom is Dostoevsky’s main concern?  What does Virginia Woolf mean when she writes that reading Dostoevsky: “against our wills we are drawn in, whirled round, blinded, suffocated, and at the same time filled with a giddy rapture.”  Why does Edmund Gosse call Dostoevsky’s novels “the cocaine and morphia of modern literature?”  In this class we undertake the exhilarating task of reading Dostoevsky’s most intense novels:  Notes from the Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov.  Our goal in this class is a dual one:  to understand the importance of these works in the historical and social context in which they were written, and also to consider what ethical force Dostoevsky’s literature has over us, its 21st century readers. All readings and discussions in English.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: none


RUSS 3990 - Directed Study in Russian

Independent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours of credit. In order to register for this course, students must devise a program of study in consultation with a faculty member and complete a form available in the Germanic & Slavic Studies office (Room 201 Joseph E. Brown Hall).

Prerequisites: Permission of department


RUSS 4001 - Advanced Russian Conversation and Composition

Advanced language study, combining instruction in grammar, composition, and stylistics with practice in spoken Russian. (Currently offered only on the UGA Study Abroad in Russia program.)

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Summer
Prerequisites: RUSS 3002


RUSS 4080 - Nabokov

A discussion-oriented survey of Vladimir Nabokov's life and works, with particular attention to questions of multicultural literary identity. In-depth consideration of the author's creative responses to two 19th-century Russian predecessors. All readings and discussions in English.

Satisfies Core Area IV (Humanities and the Arts) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: none
Professor(s): Charles Byrd


RUSS 4250 - Pushkin

An overview of Pushkin's life and oeuvre, with study of works from each major period of artistic creativity: the Lyceum, the period in St. Petersburg, exile in the South and in Mikhailovskoe, his marriage and last years. Readings include selected poetry from all periods, Eugene Onegin, and "The Queen of Spades." All works are read in the original versions, unadapted and unabridged. Conducted in Russian.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 4260 - Masterpieces of 19th-Century Russian Literature

Representative works in the original language. Conducted in Russian.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 4270 - Masterpieces of 20th-Century Russian Literature

Representative works in the original language. Conducted in Russian.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 4280 - Chekhov

Representative works from all periods of Chekhov's career. Chekhov's influence on modern literature and drama. Conducted in Russian.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture) and the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 4290 - Politically Incorrect: Contemporary Russian Literature, Art, and Cinema

A survey of representative works in contemporary Russian literature, art, and cinema. Discussion of key literary and artistic movements. The political significance of contemporary Russian literature, art, and cinema and the relationship between art and political institutions. Taught in Russian.

Satisfies the Franklin College Literature requirement.

Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 4510 - Special Topics

Seminar focusing on specific topics in Russian literature and culture or Russian and Slavic linguistics. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 hours of credit.

Topic for Fall 2015: Tolstoy on Page and Screen (Taught in English; no prerequisite required. Contact german@uga.edu if you need a prerequisite override to register.)

Prerequisites: RUSS 3001


RUSS 4520 - Contemporary Russian Culture

Survey of major trends in modern Russian society and culture. Discussion of key notions and beliefs that shape these trends. Comparison and analysis of Russians’ worldviews and self- perceptions. The course provides an overview of the political and social dynamics of modern Russia, combined with advanced language study. Taught in Russian.

Semester Offered: Fall
Prerequisites: RUSS 3002

SLAV


SLAV 1001 - Elementary Slavic Language and Culture I

The Department of Germanic & Slavic Studies is sometimes able to offer introductory courses in Slavic languages other than Russian. This course will provide students with the fundamentals of grammar, conversation, pronunciation, reading, and writing of a Slavic language, together with an introduction to the culture of the people in question. This course can be used to satisfy Core Area IV, World Languages and Cultures, but you should not take this course with the intention of satisfying a foreign language requirement for a specific major or college at the university, because we are only able to offer two semesters of instruction, and most foreign language requirements are for 3 or 4 semesters.

This course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours of credit, provided that the language of instruction is different each time. Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

In Fall 2015 Elementary Czech I will be offered as SLAV 1001.

Semester Offered: Not offered on a regular basis


SLAV 1002 - Elementary Slavic Language and Culture II

The Department of Germanic & Slavic Studies is sometimes able to offer introductory courses in Slavic languages other than Russian. This course is a continuation of SLAV 1002 and will provide students with the fundamentals of grammar, conversation, pronunciation, reading, and writing of a Slavic language, together with an introduction to the culture of the people in question. This course can be used to satisfy Core Area IV, World Languages and Cultures, but you should not take this course with the intention of satisfying a foreign language requirement for a specific major or college at the university, because we are only able to offer two semesters of instruction, and most foreign language requirements are for 3 or 4 semesters.

This course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours of credit, provided that the language of instruction is different each time. Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Culture).

Semester Offered: Not offered on a regular basis
Prerequisites: SLAV 1001


SLAV 2100 - Slavic Folklore

In this course we will discuss Slavic folklore and belief systems in different historical periods and their representation in historical accounts, stories, novels, fairy tales, legends, customs, and films. No background knowledge is required. All readings and discussions are in English. This course will introduce students to the materials and methods of folklore study through a detailed examination of important components of Slavic folk culture and beliefs. Students will read a variety of texts, including scholarly works, historical accounts, and examples of verbal folklore collected by researchers. They will also analyze representations and adaptations of folklore in literary works, film, and animation. Students will acquire knowledge of a variety of genres and images from Slavic folklore and an understanding of how folklore functions in a society and how it is transmitted from one generation to the next.

Satisfies Core Area IV (World Languages and Cultures or Humanities and the Arts) and the Franklin College Fine Arts/Philosophy/Religion requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring


SLAV 3070 - Introduction to Slavic Linguistics

This course is a survey of the Slavic family of languages, aspects of their historical development, and characteristics of their modern linguistic systems. Selected topics in the phonology, morphology, syntax, and sociolinguistics of individual Slavic languages will be addressed. The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the history and characteristic features of the Slavic languages. Students will practice analyzing texts written in different Slavic languages and will acquire a set of tools that will enable them to identify which Slavic language a given text is written in.

Crosslisted with LING 3070. No prior knowledge of a Slavic language is necessary. LING2100 is required as a prerequisite since students need to be familiar basic linguistic concepts in order to successfully complete this course.

Semester Offered: Offered in alternate years
Prerequisites: LING 2100 or 2100H


SLAV 3200 - Literature and Moral Life: The Ethics of Fiction and Non-Fiction in East European Literature

This course explores the connection between ethics and literature and how narrative influences the formation of our ethical character, based on key theory, fiction, and non-fiction texts from East European literature. We will investigate the relationship between authors and readers and differences between fiction and non-fiction. All readings and discussions in English.

Prerequisites: none


SLAV 4510 - Special Topics

Seminar focusing on specific topics in Slavic languages, literatures, or cultures.

Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours of credit.

Semester Offered: Not offered on a regular basis
Prerequisites: Permission of department


SLAV 4905 - Old Church Slavic

An introduction to Old Church Slavic (OCS), the earliest written Slavic language. Students will learn to read and translate OCS texts. The grammar and phonology of OCS will also be used as a springboard for an introduction to the prehistory of the Slavic language family.

This course is cross-listed with LING 4905/6905. Permission of the department is required to register for SLAV 4905. In order to be successful in the course students should have some knowledge of a modern Slavic language OR should have completed some other relevant coursework such as Introduction to Slavic Linguistics (SLAV/LING 3070), Historical Linguistics (LING 4690/6690), Introduction to Indo-European Studies (LING 4210/6210), or courses in another old Indo-European language.

Semester Offered: Offered in alternate years
 
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201 Joe Brown Hall
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Athens, GA 30602

(706) 542-3663
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german@uga.edu

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