SLAV 2200

Kind of Human: Animals, Children, and Robots in Russian and East European Literature and Art
Credit Hours:
3

The representation of non-human and children’s lives in Russian and East European literatures. Articulation of the human through comparison with lives considered less than human. Philosophy and ethics of non-human subjectivity. Survey of a wide range of sources, including literature, visual art, music, film, philosophical treatises. All readings in English.

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RUSS 4040

Tolstoy on Page and Screen
Credit Hours:
3

Close reading of Leo Tolstoy's greatest novels, "War and Peace" and "Anna Karenina." Screening and discussion of film adaptations. All readings and discussions in English. All films in English or with English subtitles.

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GRMN 4210

Enlightenment
Credit Hours:
3

An in-depth study of major texts from the German cultural and literary traditions, going from the Enlightenment to twentieth-century critical appraisals of that very same Enlightenment tradition. Authors considered include Kant, Mendelssohn, Goethe, Hoffmann, Rilke, Kafka, Kracauer, Simmel, Brecht, the brothers Mann, Benjamin, Riefenstahl, Celan, Arendt, Wolf, and Habermas. Taught in English.

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GRMN/LING 3770

Heritage German: Language Change and Language Shift
Credit Hours:
3

Provides a broad overview of the social and institutional factors that affect language use in German-speaking heritage communities in the United States. Emphasis is placed on quantifiable methods for correlating extra-linguistic factors with observable changes in language use over time.

Prerequisites: GRMN 3010 or 3015

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GRMN 3820

German Film
Credit Hours:
3

The history of German film and its political, social, and cultural contexts. Includes expressionism, nazi film, post-war "Heimatfilm," new German cinema, the post-wall comedy wave, and the contemporary state of German film making. Taught in German.

Prerequisites:  GRMN 3010 or 3015

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GRMN 3410

War, Sex, Nation-Building, and Empire in 19th Century Germany and Austria
Credit Hours:
3 hours

We will look at key texts by German and Austrian writers from about 1800 to 1914, looking at how writers positioned themselves in terms of nationhood and empire. German-speaking writers reacted to the Napoleonic wars and their aftermath, the French 1830 revolution, the uprisings of 1848, and the various conflicts that brought about the establishment of the Second Reich. They also responded to the nationalist movements in Poland and Hungary. In addition, writers in the Eastern parts of the Prussian/German and Austro-Hungarian states, or writers who set their stories in these locales, confront issues of nation-building and empire. We will see how sexual relations (literally and figuratively) came to represent political, class, and religious issues. We will read plays and prose by Kleist, Büchner, Stifter, Fontane, Kafka, Mann and others, including the play Frühlings Erwachen [Spring Awakening] by Wedekind. The class will watch a film of one of the plays and excerpts from the American musical Spring Awakening.  Emphasis will be placed on student-led discussions and on speaking, reading, and writing in German. Taught in German.

Prerequisites:
GRMN 3010 or GRMN 3070
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RUSS 2150

Madness, Desire, and Death in 19th Century Russian Culture and Literature
Credit Hours:
3

Explores themes of madness, desire, and death in Russian literature and the arts, focusing on the 19th century. Study of masterpieces by Russian writers (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov), as well as non-fictional documents, such as Russian medical, judicial, and philosophical treatises and essays. All readings in English.

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GRMN 3550

Contemporary Issues in German Culture, Society, and Literature
Credit Hours:
3

Offered annually as part of our Study Abroad in Freiburg program during the summer semester. This couse consists of selected contemporary topics in the culture, civilization, language, or literature of German-speaking countries. Taught in English.

Semester Offered:
Summer
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FCID 4000

Capstone in Transnational European Studies: Displaced Persons
Credit Hours:
3 hours

Broadly designed around the notion of “Displaced Persons,” the course will focus on the representation of the European transnational experience and questions of cultural difference in 20th-century German literature and film. We will read and discuss poems, plays, novels, and essays by authors such as Joseph Berger, Bertolt Brecht, George Tabori, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, Herta Müller, and Ghita Schwarz and watch and examine films by directors John Walter, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Fatih Akin and Margarethe von Trotta. A requirement for this class is the completion of a capstone project for the Transnational European Studies minor, the nature of which will be discussed during the first week of class. Taught in English.

Prerequisites:
FCID 2000 or Permission of Department - Contact german@uga.edu
Semester Offered:
Spring
Level:

GRMN 3015

Language: Engineering and Science
Credit Hours:
3 hours

In this course, students will learn about central social, cultural, economic, political and scientific issues of the 20th and early 21st centuries pertinent to the development of modern Germany as a leader in engineering and technology.

While teaching cultural and scientific content, the course simultaneously aims to make you a more competent and proficient speaker and writer of German. You will also continue to hone your listening and reading skills as we watch videos and read articles on technological developments in Germany from online news websites such as Deutsche Welle, Bild der Wissenschaft, Natur and others. This course also includes grammar review and vocabulary development.

Prerequisites:
GRMN 2002 or GRMN 2110
Duplicate Credit:
GRMN 3010; Students who have taken 3010 may not enroll in 3015
Semester Offered:
Spring
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